Having moved to their new home in Offenham in June 2009, Sheila & Adrian James have created a new garden there from scratch.  They now open the garden on specific dates under the NGS (yellow book), and by arrangement for small group visits from which donations to local charities are made from money raised.

Please contact us with your enquiries about small group visits.

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Langdale Winter 2017 / 2018

Daphne odora It has felt like a long winter.  Everyone we speak to says the same.  But even on the darkest, foulest of days there are still many things to enjoy out in the garden.

common snowdrop Galanthus nivalisI do love to see snowdrops, best of all masses of them growing in woodland.  At Langdale we don’t have mass plantings of snowdrops, nor do we have woodland, but we do have a number of clumps of named snowdrops around the place and we do have lots of the common snowdrop Galanthus nivalis happily multiplying under the beech hedge (left).  And just at that time of the year when we need something to keep us going, they fill my heart with joy.

Scent plays a big part in the winter garden.  And for my money scent doesn’t come much sweeter than that of Daphne odora “Aureomarginata” (right).  Situated close to the path we get to enjoy its scent every time we go into the garden from mid-winter to spring.  They may not be the longest lived of plants, but there will always be a place for Daphne odora in our garden.